Wet Prairie and Calcareous Woodlands
Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park

Ohio geologist Jane Forsyth, in a 1971 article “Geobotany” explained the relationship between vegetation, soil type and the geologic history of Ohio. Batelle Darby is contained within the western portion of the state, which is underlain by erodible limestone and dolomite. The result after erosion is a flat level landscape. At Battelle Darby, the limestone is near enough to the surface to affect the soil chemistry, resulting in a suite of lime-loving species that have an affinity to calcareous sites.

Scroll to the bottom of this page to read the article.

To view the key points about lime-loving plants
mentioned in “Geobotany,” use the image slider below.

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PLANT LIST
(Battelle Darby Metro Park)
With Links to Species Pages

 Carpinus caroliniana Walter   BLUE-BEECH  Betulaceae  native sm tree
 Celtis occidentalis L.   HACKBERRY  Ulmaceae  native tree
 Ostrya virginiana (Miller) K. Koch   HOP-HORNBEAM  Betulaceae  native tree
 Parthenocissus quinquefolia (L.) Planch.   VIRGINIA CREEPER  Vitaceae  native vine
 Platanus occidentalis L.   SYCAMORE  Platanaceae  native tree
 Populus deltoides W. Bartram ex Marshall   EASTERN COTTONWOOD  Salicaceae  native tree
 Prunus serotina Ehrh.   BLACK CHERRY  Rosaceae  native tree
 Quercus muehlenbergii Engelm.   CHINQUAPIN OAK  Fagaceae  native tree
 Sassafras albidum (Nutt.) Nees   SASSAFRAS  Lauraceae  native tree
 Tilia americana L.   AMERICAN BASSWOOD  Tiliaceae  native tree
 Viburnum prunifolium L.   BLACK-HAW  Caprifoliaceae  native shrub
 Zanthoxylum americanum Mill.   PRICKLY-ASH  Rutaceae  native shrub

 

Vids
(in no particular order)

Virginia creeper

Sassafras
common prickly-ash
eastern hophornbeam
hackberry
chinquapin oak
black haw
blaxk cherry
basswood
American sycamore
American hornbeam
eastern cottonwood
Geobotany Artivcle
GEOBOTANY-ARTICLE (1)